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Posts from the ‘Abstract’ Category

Sunrise = Sunset

Have you ever noticed that sunrises and sunsets look alike? Sometimes you only see sunsets (as I do), or sometimes you only see sunrises (as a friend of a friend who lives in Brooklyn does). But when you look at the photos we take, you can’t tell which is which. (Ditto for the paintings I create based on those photos.) It all depends on which way your windows face. Mine face west, his face east. Sunrise = sunset. They look the same.

And here are some examples. If you don’t look at the titles, would you know which was which?

Sunrise Sunset

Sicilian Sunset

Sara’s Sunset (actually, this was a sunrise)

Palisades Sunset

Winter Sunset II

There are more, but I rest my case. Sunrise = Sunset.

I liked it afterall

It took me a little longer than I thought, but I did finally continue the painting I mentioned in my last blog post. You know, the one that was talking to me. And I decided that I liked it afterall. I didn’t want to “fix” it.

So I intensified the trees a little but left their jagged edges and focused on the path and the shadows. It was painstaking work to keep some edges smooth and have some just be a little soft (jagged), but redoing the whole painting was no longer an option. I made the sky a little more of that soft green…

So I think it’s done … at least for now. Who knows? Maybe the next time I look at it, it will talk to me again.

It’s talking to me …

Any artist worth her salt will say the painting “talks” to her. No beginning artist really understands. “Talks?” But it’s true and I have a current example. It’s talking to me …

I have a photo taken in Antigua which I love. I’ve wanted to paint it for years: the shadows on the path, the light shining through the trees … It’s a very complex landscape so I decided to do a sketch to try and avoid some of the pitfalls. Here’s the cropped and greatly simplified sketch.

Without thinking about it too much (my first mistake), I sketched it very lightly on a 18×14 piece of raw canvas taped down to a larger piece of foamcore. Using fluid acrylic only slightly thinned with water, I started to paint the land next to the path and noticed that getting hard edges was going to be difficult. Well, duh. The painting was already starting to “talk” to me.

But I was committed, so I started on the trees with fluid acrylic thinned with a lot more water, since I wanted it to be fairly light to start. I would make it darker with additional layers of paint. By now the painting is fairly “screaming” at me.

What should have been nice smooth edges simply weren’t. Taking a deep breath, I decided to “listen.” I stopped and let it dry.

Background: I paint on raw canvas with thinned fluid acrylic because I like the soft- (in some cases non-) edges, the atmospheric effect. And because I wanted that effect for the leafy part of the trees, I ignored the difficulty I was going to have with the branches and tree trunks, the ground and path, and the shadows.

So this isn’t a made-for-tv story with a happy ending … at least not yet. I confess I kinda like this jagged edges effect and I certainly right now have no idea how I’m going to make this work. I could continue as is with all the edges being jagged, and see how that turns out. Or I can try to “fix” the edges, but that involves matte medium and a lot of work. It’s going to take a lot of thought (what I should have done at the beginning, since I know how unforgiving raw canvas is and how hard it is to correct mistakes).

So I’ll think about it over the weekend and then decide. It certainly would have been better/easier if I’d “listened” to the painting at the beginning.

They’re throwbacks … sorta.

The past two weeks in California visiting my son, his wife and their new son, were wonderful. It was good to get out of my small NYC universe, travel by plane, and finally see my new grandson. I believe in traveling light, so the only art supplies I took were a tiny travel watercolor set, a few brushes, a small (5×7) watercolor sketch pad. Definitely minimal. That’s the good news. The bad (sorta) news is that I had to paint with watercolor, something I haven’t done in years. So the six paintings I produced, well, they’re throwbacks … sorta.

I won’t show the first ones at all, since they really just count as practice. Funny, when I was transitioning from watercolor to acrylic years ago, all I could think was: “This would be so much easier in watercolor.” The last two weeks, all I could think was: “This would be so much easier in acrylic.”

The first one was California skyline seen from a car on a highway on the way back from somewhere. I made a few artistic modifications here and there …

Sky

The California hills are very brown and dry looking (my son says they look like that most of the year), so that was the origin of my second painting.

Again some artistic license.

I liked these last two enough that I may try turning them into larger acrylic paintings. Which is what I sorta wanted to do while I was in California.

Now that we can start traveling again, I may have to get used to turning initial watercolor sketches into larger acrylic paintings.

Spring’s last gasp

I know, it’s still April … so it’s still Spring. But I’m tired of trying to paint Spring paintings. So this is Spring’s last gasp, at least as far as my paintings go.

Spring 9×12 Acrylic on canvas board

Finally, a Spring painting I really like. [You’d be amazed at how many of my paintings I don’t like. They get gessoed over.] These colors really speak to me of Spring.

So far, this is my 4th (and last) Spring painting. So I guess I’m not going to create a Spring series afterall.

I know, it’s Spring

The weather has been weird lately, warm then cold, then warm then very cold, then very warm (almost balmy), then … well, you get the picture. I know, it’s Spring.

So it’s definitely time for me to stop my Winter series and try something new. Maybe a Spring series? Well, so far I’ve done three mini 6×6 Spring paintings, but my heart is not in it. I don’t like the first one at all, so I’m going to gesso over it.

Spring 2

Spring 2 is the second of my Spring minis, acrylic with a palette knife on a 6×6 art panel. Not sure what to say about it.

Spring 3

And Spring 3 is the third (duh). Also acryllic with a palette knife on a 6×6 art panel. The yellow does make me think of forsythia, of which there is lots outside, but I’m not sure the rest of the colors are very spring-like. Somehow it’s much harder to paint “Spring.”

I may just have to move on to something else.

It’s still winter

The weather outside has mellowed a little, but I continue to paint these simplified winter scenes on mini (6×6) canvases with a palette knife. In my head it’s still winter.

Winter 5

Winter 5 is fascinating to me. Seen up close it’s just a mess of pale colors and raised paint ridges. When you pull back a little it becomes an abstracted winter scene. There are bands of clouds in the sky, trees and even a path or two. At the time I painted it, my nose was about a foot from the painting and yet I was painting the scene you can only really “see” from a distance.

Winter 6

In Winter 6, I simplified the colors, modified one of my favorite trees a little and placed the land at an angle. I’m starting to like the way my shaky hands and the palette knife create the texture.

Winter 7

I brought back the yellow oxide for the clouds just over the top of the hill, but now that I re-examine it, Winter 7 doesn’t look like much of anything real. It’s the most abstracted of these mini paintings so far. For years, I struggled to abstract from the model, or from a real scene. Here it just happened.

Winter 8

And last but not least, Winter 8 is a little more representational, but still pretty abstract.

So with all of these Winter minis, I couldn’t create what I was trying to (smooth expanses of snow with muted, vague shapes). The palette knife made that unrealistic. Instead, I’ve created mini abstract paintings with a lot of texture. And I like them — some more than others — but I like them.

But in my head, it’s still winter, so I think I’ll try to recreate these scenes using my preferred acrylic on raw canvas. To be continued…

Experimenting with Winter

Well, it’s cold … and bleak … and the colors have disappeared (like New Jersey, normally seen from my window). Winter is here, and my attempts last month to dispell some of the gloom by painting summer colors just didn’t last. So this time I’m just going to wallow in it, paint winter scenes, some from childhood memories, some from photos. I am experimenting with Winter, using a pallette knife (instead of a brush), on mini (6×6) canvases, gessoed (not raw canvas) and with a very limited color pallette (white, blue, brown and varying shades of gray).

It’s been a challenge, but that’s what I needed. I’ve never used a palette knife before and I admit it’s been hard to get the effect I want. These canvases are small, so the compositions are very simple. Since these are all experiments, I haven’t given them names…

Winter 1

Not that it matters, but the hill is based on a childhood park hill I used to ski down, and the tree is based on an old NYT photo. The more I look at it, the more I think it could be a summer beach scene (wishful thinking?) the snow is more beige than white. City snow does tend to get dirty fast, but …

Winter 2

Well, the snow is still beigey, but it is smoother. Maybe the pallette knife was the wrong choice for the look I’m trying to achieve.

Winter 3

This is clearly not a beach scene and it reminds me of the view I had in Patagonia from the top of the chair lift. I did a very different painting on raw canvas right after that trip. That was in the summer, of course, so it’s interesting I used that memory for this winter scene.

Winter 4

This makes me think of a fairy tale. I think I still need to soften the path leading up to the little house in the trees. Not sure where this one came from.

I have four more litttle mini canvases so there will be a sequel to this post. It’s still winter, but the weather is not bothering me so much now.

Good news vs the news

One piece of good news: I and my husband have gotten our second Moderna doses (we are both over 75). Halleluia! But it’s still not a free pass to visit our new grandchild in California. We’ll have to see what the CDC and Dr. Fauci say about whether we can shed the virus…

In the meantime, it’s been snowing in NY and I’ve been trying to paint what I am remembering (rather than focusing on the news I am seeing on TV). So two of my snow scenes…

Winter Sunset 24×30 Acrylic on raw canvas

Winter Sunset II 24×30 Acrylic on raw canvas

Clearly these are both idealized winter scenes, vaguely remembered from my childhood in Canada: wide open spaces, lots of snow, some trees and a beautiful sunset.

Unfortunately, all of this is not completely distracting me from what is happening in the impeachment trial on TV. And really unfortunately, although the House Impeachment managers did an amazingly convincing job, Trump’s defense attorneys were anything but convincing (we all saw the whole thing unfold on TV) and we all know Donald Trump is guilty, he was acquitted. Mitch McConnell tried to have it both ways: Trump is guilty as sin, but I (Mitch) voted for acquittal. It’s enough to make you tear your hair out!

But I’ve been called the eternal optimist (among other things), so …

My snow scenes, I think, are peaceful, calm … rather than bleak.

Life can be grim; paintings can be happy

Well, things haven’t gotten any better since my last post: the pandemic is raging more out of control than ever, and the more we learn about the break-in and riot in the US Capitol the worse it looks. To try and cheer myself up, I have been painting “happy” paintings. If life can be grim, paintings can be happy.

I’ve actually made some small improvements to the two paintings I posted on Dec. 16, 2020 and added a new one showing where I’d like to be (rather than in my NYC apartment with a TV set showing all the grim news).

So, the latest happy painting where people don’t get sick and democratically elected Presidents don’t reveal themselves to be autocrats:

Hopefully 16×23

And the two earlier paintings with some minor improvements:

Wishful Thinking 15×19

Fall Dream 16×22

All of these paintings are acrylic on raw canvas which allows me to be as misty and atmospheric as I want, without worrying about hard edges (realities) and specific details (often depressing).

In these paintings I am where I want to be: in a warm, colorful, happy place.